entertainment pr london, House pr, Media Brands & Entertainment PR, Uncategorized

The House PR survivor’s guide for fending of the rainy summer blues

By House PR – Media, Brands & Entertainment PR in London

London may be suffering a rain-drenched summer, but House PR is on hand to help people fend of those rainy day blues with its exclusive list of fun things to do and places to see when outside is wet and gloomy.

First off, Empire Cinemas, the UK’s top independent cinema chain, is showcasing the long-awaited Batman action spinoff, Suicide Squad – starring Jared Leto as the Joker, Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn and Will Smith as Dead Shot. Immerse yourself in the bizarre world of comics’ arch-villains of crime with a huge of tub of crunchy goodies to fight off the movie munchies.

Empire Cinemas is also on hand with other summer movie blockbusters, including the Finding Nemo sequel, Finding Dory; the latest chapter in the Star Trek series, Star Trek Beyond; and the iconic kiddie classic The BFG.

House PR adds to the list with its three favourite London eateries that make keeping out of the rain super-fun, also recommending the restaurant booking service OpenTable. OpenTable lets you find the best restaurants in your locality with special information filters and extras, such as speciality cuisines and customer reviews about restaurants all over the UK.

  1. Cutter & Squidge in Soho, London W1

    Cutter & Squidge is a bakery for the 21st century, famous for its use of natural coloured and flavoured tea-time treats. Its venue has warm and welcoming seating and is the perfect way to have a delicious fun time on a wet afternoon.

  2.  

    Beach Blanket Babylon in Shoreditch, London E1

    This venue is a favourite among locals for both its food and fabulous drinks menu. On the food front, it’s open throughout the day, just as well for a slap-up dinner, a filling brunch or a scrumptious lunch. Plus, it’s a favoured meeting point for a session of relaxed fun with a hip list of cocktails, wines and champagnes – a guaranteed recipe for feeling sunny on the inside when it’s wet on the outside.

  3.  

    Annie’s in Barnes, London SW13

    Apart from its delicious food offerings, Annie’s is famed for its unusual décor – a mix of flower vases of different sizes, darkly coloured flooring and mismatched wall coverings. Like many of London eateries, it’s open for dinner, brunch and lunch.

House PR is also keen to offer up a couple of rainy day recommendations on the culture front:

First, House PR recommends the astonishing David Hockney’s portrait exhibition. Currently a headline exhibition at London’s Royal Academy of Art on Piccadilly, David Hockney RA: 82 portraits and 1 still life will be running until the autumn. A study in portraiture, it showcases 82 portraits by the famous artists of different people, sitting in the same chair, each completed in a day and a half, with each subject seated slightly differently.

Second, House PR is urging everyone to visit the highest garden in London at the Shard. The Height of Summer at The View from The Shard is a celebration of the iconic English Garden in the tallest building in Western Europe and offers the unique chance to have a cocktail 72 floors up.

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ginny paton, House pr, Lifestyle PR london, Uncategorized

House PR launch of Mountain Warehouse ‘Jacket In’ clothing recycling initiative By House PR

House PR – Lifestyle PR London

Clothing recycling for charity got an added boost in April as the clothing retailer Mountain Warehouse teamed up with Clothes Aid in a highly innovative ‘Jacket In’ drive to get consumers to recycle their old jackets in exchange for a discount on a new one.

According to House PR, Clothes Aid will be handling post-donation logistics and passing on any sales receipts to the major UK youth charity, the YMCA. Meanwhile until the beginning of June, customers will get the benefit of a 20% discount on a jacket from this season’s new collection.

Some 170 Mountain Warehouse outlets across England, Scotland and Wales will be participating in the campaign and organisers are hoping that consumers will be using the opportunity to update their wardrobes.

House PR have also supported and advised on a social media dimension to the Jacket In campaign with an exciting photograph contest every week. Purchasers who upload pictures of themselves wearing a jacket in an adventure outdoor setting with the hashtag #MWJacketIn stand to win a spanking new jacket.

At YMCA HQ, CEO Denise Hatton, said her organisation is “thrilled” at being a stakeholder in Mountain Warehouse’s Jacket In initiative. She said all the different parts of the YMCA organisation in the UK will benefit from any monies raised for their ongoing, year-round work with young people, which also involves essential support work.

House PR’s efforts at gaining media interest in the Jacket In campaign has focused on local press, including online, right across the UK, in Wales, Scotland and different parts of England. House PR also managed to get coverage of Mountain Warehouse’s Jacket In campaign on Bridge FM.

Ginny Paton on a Planner’s role in a PR Agency

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ginny paton, House pr, public relations london

Ginny Paton on a Planner’s role in a PR Agency

Planners provide the rigour behind our creativity – says Ginny Paton

Planners play an important role in the modern PR agency. At my agency we use planners all the time, and they really strengthen the work that we do says Ginny Paton.

The origin of the planner was in the advertising industry, where they bridged the gap between the creatives and the business leaders who were focused on the bottom line says Ginny Paton.

Their typical duties came before a campaign began in the shape of consumer insight, research and brand positioning. They also got involved after a campaign was completed, in the shape of evaluation says Ginny Paton.

But PR agencies like mine have, over the last decade, begun to take on planners as well. It’s partly due to the fact that client needs are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and so the old reliance on our wits and a packed contact book simply won’t suffice any more. We need insight to back our ideas.

Planning teams do more though – they provide access to those all-important marketing budgets, often far meatier than PR budgets. And they also provide valuable weight when pitching to potential clients says Ginny Paton.

From what I’ve seen in pitches says Ginny Paton, clients love a good creative idea – and they love it even more when we show how we got there says Ginny Paton. The rigour of research is far more valuable than creativity which does not relate to the brand’s situation. We need to take on board insights such as how their customers feel about their brand compared to their competitors.

Planning directors really came into their own when digital took off. Digital provides data, and data enables planners to do their planning in real time. Digital skills are certainly something that a good planner needs to have, along with the ability to get deep into data to find out what it can tell us about the world says Ginny Paton.

There are other personality types that make good planners. Those with the ability to think laterally and be imaginative. Those who are able to challenge assumptions with a strong curiosity. The desired outcome is to develop a new way of looking at the world.

In my experience, there’s just one problem with using planners in PR – it isn’t advertising. It’s not as predictable, with planning cycles often closer to three weeks than three months says Ginny Paton

Despite this, it is still really important that we have these skills to hand. It feeds into a general movement for PR agencies to become more structured in their creativity.

These developments provide a useful counter-balance to that all-important gut feeling which should always play a part in PR creativity says Ginny Paton

Ginny Paton – MD House PR

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ginny paton, House pr, public relations london

PR consultants – the modern problem solvers – by Ginny Paton

Remember when the job of the PR agency was simply to come along near the end of a campaign to make some calls to the national newspapers?

Thank God those days are now largely over – agencies like House PR (Ginny Paton is MD) are far more likely to be giving insights as part of their ongoing day to day activities for their clients. This is a hugely varied role, so it leads us to the question of what the true purpose of a PR consultancy is, these days.

Well if you ask me, the PR consultant is uniquely placed to be an all-round solver of client problems. PR professionals of today can and should be the first point of contact for the CEO or the MD, providing insights on handling crises, sorting a launch across diverse media, helping with a new corporate strategy, or informing business priorities.

That’s why PR consultancies are frequently going after the same account work as management consultants – but we have one advantage. We bring our creative skills to the party.

While we come at our work from a background of understanding comms and the press, we bring our analytical skills to bear on many more strategic activities than gaining media coverage.

But a key point to bear in mind is that we can only earn that role by being channel-neutral about the advice we hand out. We could advise them to spend their money on advertising rather than PR, for instance. Or digital marketing. Or a combination of all three.

Why do I think that the PR consultant is best placed to take on this job, rather than those other advisors surrounding a brand? Because our range of awareness is very broad. PR people have to be analytical and they have to have a strong understanding of business drivers and the pitfalls that could occur to a company. But they also need to know their current affairs, and their way around a marketing strategy.

And what’s most important, they can give consideration to all of these issues in a holistic manner.

Recently, House PR has been asked by clients to suggest ad firms, to take part in internal recruitment meetings, and we have given advice to CEOs on all sorts of business plans. That’s because our clients trust us, and we know their businesses implicitly.

We at House PR take a problem-solving approach. We give the best possible answer to a question, even if the answer isn’t what you’d consider to be traditional PR.

That might seem odd, but only if your view of PR is severely outdated. If you open your mind to the capabilities of the modern PR consultancy, you’ll be impressed by how it can enhance businesses of all kinds.

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